St Joseph's Catholic Primary School

  1. Overview

The ‘basic’ school curriculum includes the ‘national curriculum’, as well as religious education and sex education.

The national curriculum is a set of subjects and standards used by primary and secondary schools so children learn the same things. It covers what subjects are taught and the standards children should reach in each subject.

Other types of school like academies and private schools don’t have to follow the national curriculum. Academies must teach a broad and balanced curriculum including English, maths and science. They must also teach religious education.

Some elements of the National curriculum that relate to Mathematics:

 

 

Key Stage 1

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions
  • Create and debug simple programs.
  • Use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs.
  • Use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content.
  • Use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; know where to go for help and support when they have concerns about material on the internet.
  • Recognise common uses of information technology beyond school.

Key Stage 2 (Lower and Upper)

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts.
  • Use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output.
  • Use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs.
  • Understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the world-wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration.
  • Select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information.

 

Key Stage 1

Year 1

Fractions

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Recognise, find and name a half as one of two equal parts of an object, shape or quantity.
  • Recognise, find and name a quarter as one of four equal parts of an object, shape or quantity.

Year 2

Multiplication and division

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 multiplication tables, including recognising odd and even numbers.
  • Calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (x), division (÷) and equals (=) signs.

Fractions

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Recognise, find, name and write fractions 1/3, 1/4, 2/4, 3/4 of a length, shape, set of objects or quantity.
  • Write simple fractions, e.g., 1/2 of 6 = 3 and recognise the equivalence of 2/4 and 1/2.

Lower Key Stage 2

Year 3

Addition and subtraction

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Add and subtract numbers with up to three digits, using formal written methods of columnar addition and subtraction.

Multiplication and division

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 3, 4 and 8 multiplication tables.

Fractions

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Add and subtract fractions with the same denominator within one whole (e.g., 5/7 + 1/7 = 6/7).

Year 4

Addition and subtraction

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Add and subtract numbers with up to four digits using the formal written methods of columnar addition and subtraction where appropriate.

Multiplication and division

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Recall multiplication and division facts for multiplication tables up to 12 x 12.

Fractions

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Add and subtract fractions with the same denominator.

Upper Key Stage 2

Year 5

Multiplication and division

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Solve problems involving multiplication and division where large numbers are used by decomposing them into factors.

Fractions (including decimals and percentages)

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Recognise mixed numbers and improper fractions and convert from one form to the other (e.g., 2/5 + 4/5 = 6/5 = 1 1/5).

Year 6

Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Divide numbers up to four digits by a two-digit whole number using the formal written method of long division, and interpret remainders as whole number remainders, fractions, or by rounding, as appropriate for the context.

Fractions (including decimals and percentages)

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Multiply simple pairs of proper fractions, writing the answer in its simplest form (e.g., 1/4 x 1/2 = 1/8).

Algebra

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Express missing number problems algebraically
  • Use simple formulae expressed in words
  • Generate and describe linear number sequences
  • Find pairs of numbers that satisfy number sentences involving two unknowns
  • Enumerate all possibilities of combinations of two variables.

At St Joseph's-Mathematics is an essential tool for success in life. We believe that a solid grasp of mathematics will equip pupils with a uniquely powerful set of tools to understand and change the world. The children will learn a rich network of concepts and relationships that provide a way of viewing and making sense of the world. Through mathematics the children will be taught to analyse, sort and communicate information and ideas and to tackle a range of practical tasks and real life problems.

Mathematics is a core subject and is taught daily to all pupils throughout the school. It is taught as a discrete subject as well as through cross-curricular topics. Mathematics is accessible to everyone regardless of cultural or linguistic boundaries and tools include logical reasoning, problem solving skills and the ability to think in abstract ways. We endeavour to ensure that children develop an enthusiastic attitude to mathematics and insist on its application to everyday life.

We aim to:

  • develop a confidence in and an enthusiasm for mathematics. 
  • encourage pupils to challenge themselves.
  • develop pupils' mathematical concepts, skills and knowledge
  • develop children's confidence and competence in mathematical knowledge, concepts and skills
  • emphasise the importance of, and the ability to perform mental calculations
  • provide opportunities for pupils to use and apply their numeracy skills in a wide range of situations
  • provide opportunities for mathematical thinking and discussion
  • develop an understanding of numeracy through a process of enquiry and experiment

We aim to provide opportunities for pupils to use and develop their mathematical skills using ICT and across the broader curriculum, as well as providing opportunities for children to use and apply their mathematical skills in a meaningful context.

Each child will have the opportunity to develop their mathematical understanding by:

  • using a range of ICT resources and websites to challenge thinking and develop mathematical concepts
  • a range of challenging activities, games, and problem solving activities that encourage maths discussion
  • using a range of mental and written strategies to solve problems
  • work individually, in pairs or in groups

Above all, we want to see children achieve, develop their understanding of key concepts and have fun with maths!

We aim to ensure that all children are engaged and excited by mathematics. To achieve this we provide opportunities for children to experience the subject in a wider context. These opportunities include valuing and highlighting the importance of using money wisely through collection, counting and other fundraising activities linked to the mission of the church.

Mathematics is taught in a variety of ways but at its heart is a desire to make it exciting, accessible and challenging so that all students are able to achieve their full potential.

Students study a broad range of topics within mathematics: - Number, Algebra, Shape and Space, Handling Data and Probability. They are taught direct skills but also encouraged to develop their problem solving skills both independently and within groups.

Mathematics is a core subject but its wide ranging application and usage means it is an area that ALL students should be able to access and use with confidence. Students will be prepared for a changing world of technology and employment and having a solid mathematics foundation will assist them in this area.

We are committed to ensuring that all children know their number bonds(tables) and ask parents to help us with this.

Once a week we have a 'Mighty maths' session, where every child (Year 2 upwards) moves into ability groups to work on key maths skills at a stage appropriate to their development.